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Eurovision 2022: What it’s really like behind the scenes

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Eurovision 2022: What it’s really like behind the scenes

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes at the world’s biggest live music event?

The 66th Eurovision Song Contest kicked off in spectacular form on Saturday night as 24 countries competed in the grand final round in Turin, Italy.

Hosted by British pop sensation Mika, Italian singer Laura Pausini and TV presenter Alessandro Cattelan, the glittering extravaganza saw Ukraine’s Kalush Orchestra take the crown.

EXCLUSIVE: What it’s really like behind the scenes at Eurovision – from frantic set changes and crying contestants to glitter bombs and a VERY strict flag-waving rule. (Pictured: Eurovision 2022 live at PalaOlimpico, Turin, Italy)

Daily Mail Australia was in the audience at the live show thanks to Eurovision’s Official Travel Partner Booking.com, and can now exclusively reveal the Eurovision secrets they don’t show on television.

Set changes 

Eurovision is synonymous with extravagant set design, and this year’s live show was no different.

And with 24 different performances taking place in quick succession on Saturday, it was no surprise the Eurovision crew members were working on overdrive.

High octane display: The 66th Eurovision Song Contest kicked off in spectacular form on Saturday night as 24 countries competed in the grand final round in Turin, Italy

High octane display: The 66th Eurovision Song Contest kicked off in spectacular form on Saturday night as 24 countries competed in the grand final round in Turin, Italy

Props to them! Eurovision is synonymous with extravagant set design, and this year's live show was no different. Britain's Sam Ryder performed inside a large metal cage, which was wheeled onstage by crew members

Props to them! Eurovision is synonymous with extravagant set design, and this year’s live show was no different. Britain’s Sam Ryder performed inside a large metal cage, which was wheeled onstage by crew members 

Rapid fire: With 24 different performances taking place in quick succession on Saturday, it was no surprise the Eurovision crew members were working on overdrive. Azerbaijan's Nadir Rustamli sang on a large bleacher

Rapid fire: With 24 different performances taking place in quick succession on Saturday, it was no surprise the Eurovision crew members were working on overdrive. Azerbaijan’s Nadir Rustamli sang on a large bleacher 

Quick change: Stagehands could be seen scurrying frantically across the stage, setting up elaborate structures in a matter of seconds between performances. Australia's Sheldon Riley sang on a set of winding stairs

Quick change: Stagehands could be seen scurrying frantically across the stage, setting up elaborate structures in a matter of seconds between performances. Australia’s Sheldon Riley sang on a set of winding stairs 

Stagehands could be seen scurrying frantically across the stage, setting up elaborate structures in a matter of seconds between performances. 

Props included a set of bleachers, a huge metal cage and a winding white staircase. 

Emotional displays

While performers may appear cool and confident on stage, many of them broke into tears of joy as soon as the cameras stopped rolling. 

Emotions: While performers may appear cool and confident on stage, many of them broke into tears of joy as soon as the cameras stopped rolling

Emotions: While performers may appear cool and confident on stage, many of them broke into tears of joy as soon as the cameras stopped rolling

Raw: Australia's own Sheldon Riley (pictured) wept a few joyous tears in the final moments of his performance, but managed to keep it together until the end of the song

Raw: Australia’s own Sheldon Riley (pictured) wept a few joyous tears in the final moments of his performance, but managed to keep it together until the end of the song

Australia’s own Sheldon Riley wept a few joyous tears in the final moments of his performance, but managed to keep it together until the end of the song. 

Many performers were also seen high-fiving and jumping into each other’s arms as soon as they walked off stage.

A feast for the eyes 

Eurovision certainly didn’t skimp on special effects this year.

From an on-stage fountain and surprise pyrotechnics to lasers and a massive glitter bomb, audience members weren’t short of places to look.

Perhaps the most unusual prop was a mammoth love-heart balloon, which was inflated on stage within a matter of seconds.

Razzle dazzle! From an on-stage fountain and surprise pyrotechnics to lasers and a massive glitter bomb, audience members weren't short of places to look

Razzle dazzle! From an on-stage fountain and surprise pyrotechnics to lasers and a massive glitter bomb, audience members weren’t short of places to look

Big love! Perhaps the most unusual prop was a mammoth love-heart balloon, which was inflated on stage within a matter of seconds

Big love! Perhaps the most unusual prop was a mammoth love-heart balloon, which was inflated on stage within a matter of seconds

The special effects continued to dazzle until the last moment, thanks to a storm of confetti that rained down on the stage as Ukraine was crowned the winner. 

Special audience rules 

Audience members were given instructions on how to conduct themselves during the performances.

Before the television broadcast went live to air, a production staffer took to the stage to encourage everyone to clap and cheer for all performers – no matter which country they were representing.

Rules of engagement: Audience members were given instructions on how to conduct themselves during the performances

Rules of engagement: Audience members were given instructions on how to conduct themselves during the performances

Love wins: Audience members were all given special love-heart flags at the beginning of the night, but were told not to wave them until Mika took to the stage at the end of the show

Love wins: Audience members were all given special love-heart flags at the beginning of the night, but were told not to wave them until Mika took to the stage at the end of the show 

Ambiance: During the slower songs, the words 'Phone Lights On' would flash above the stage, indicating the audience should turn on their phone's torches and wave them around

Ambiance: During the slower songs, the words ‘Phone Lights On’ would flash above the stage, indicating the audience should turn on their phone’s torches and wave them around 

Pictured: Guests representing their countries as they enter Eurovision

Pictured: Guests representing their countries as they enter Eurovision 

Audience members were all given special love-heart flags at the beginning of the night, but were told not to wave them until Mika took to the stage at the end of the show. 

During the slower songs, the words ‘Phone Lights On’ would flash above the stage, indicating the crowd should turn on their phone’s torches and wave them around.

Unfortunate blunders

Co-host Pausini suffered an unfortunate faux pas after she suddenly disappeared from the stage moments before the winner was announced.

Disappearing act: Co-host Pausini suffered an unfortunate faux pas after she suddenly disappeared from the stage moments before the winner was announced

Disappearing act: Co-host Pausini suffered an unfortunate faux pas after she suddenly disappeared from the stage moments before the winner was announced

With Laura a no-show, it was up to Mika and Cattelan to continue presenting the scoring results as a twosome.

Rumours began spreading that Pausini had taken ill or suffered a wardrobe malfunction.

Luckily, Pausini managed to make it back onstage in time for the big announcement. 

Overexcited: Luckily, Pausini managed to make it back on stage in time for the big announcement. When asked by her co-hosts about why she was so late, the songstress simply joked: 'I was too excited!'

Overexcited: Luckily, Pausini managed to make it back on stage in time for the big announcement. When asked by her co-hosts about why she was so late, the songstress simply joked: ‘I was too excited!’

When asked by her co-hosts about why she was so late, the songstress simply joked: ‘I was too excited!’ 

Elsewhere, British TV personality Graham Norton had to correct a slightly embarrassed Mika after he made not one, but two blunders while hosting. 

The Grace Kelly singer visited the green room to chat to some of the contestants taking part in the contest, but accidentally misintroduced two countries.

The singer approached Romania by calling them Spain – before doing the exact same thing when introducing Poland moments later, dubbing them Holland instead. 

Saviour: British TV personality Graham Norton (right) had to correct a slightly embarrassed Mika (left) after he made not one, but two blunders while hosting

Saviour: British TV personality Graham Norton (right) had to correct a slightly embarrassed Mika (left) after he made not one, but two blunders while hosting 

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